3 Cooking Styles that Make You Sick

Get ready to blow your mind with this food fact about your healthy lunch:

How you cook is just as important as what you cook!

1. Reason one-million-and-one to avoid deep-fried, well, everything?!

The greasy, and yes, usually yummy stuff is horrible for you. The oil used is often high in saturated fat which can cause cholesterol problems, heart disease and obesity. Plus, the high temperatures used in frying produce a chemical called acrylamide, which has been linked to a higher risk for certain cancers.

Related: 6 Kitchen Hacks You Can’t Live Without

2. While grilling may be your go-to… Hold up a second.

When foods are exposed to an open flame, chemicals can form that can also up your cancer risk. A couple safety tips: frequently turn foods over when exposed to high heat and remove any black, charred sections.

3.Baking’s got to be good, right?

Well, maybe. Any dry heat cooking at high temps can lead to the formation of something called AGES proven to cause inflammation, and linked to things like diabetes and heart disease. The latest study recommends baking at lower temps, using acidic marinades like lemon juice or vinegar to help the meat stay intact. Try boiling or stewing, instead.

Related: Don’t Be a Newbie in the Kitchen!

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About the author

Dr. Jennifer Miranda

Dr. Jennifer Miranda is a board certified Internal Medicine physician who believes that doctors should make a difference in the quality of people’s lives. To this end, she founded Pure Executive Health & Wellness, a comprehensive medical practice centered around the importance of the patient-physician relationship in achieving total body wellness.

Dr. Miranda is a Magna Cum Laude graduate of Harvard University where she received her Bachelor of Arts degree. While at Harvard, she was a four-time recipient of the annual John Harvard Scholarship for academic achievement of highest distinction, and she was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa, the prestigious collegiate national honor society. She then attended the University of Miami School of Medicine where she graduated with selection into Alpha Omega Alpha, which is the highest honor someone can obtain during their medical education. Her exceptional skills as a resident led to her selection as Intern of the Year and later as Chief Medical Resident at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital. She also has extensive knowledge in the field of Functional Medicine, and has recently completed a 2 year comprehensive program at the University of Miami.